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AP 604.1 - Curriculum Management Plan IFSD 91 | JULY 2016 IFSD91 Curriculum Management Plan Guidelines and Procedures This document describes the Idaho Falls School district’s philosophy and procedures for curriculum design, management, implementation, and evaluation. It defines roles and responsibilities for curriculum implementation and provides information to ensure that board policy and district administrative procedures are followed, consistent with the district’s philosophy about teaching and learning. CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE…………………………………………………………………………………….1 DEFINITIIONS…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES…………………………………………………………………………………8 PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES………………………………………………………………11 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, AND EVALUATION……………………..12 INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES AND SELECTION PROCEDURES…………………………………..17 REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………..19 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN PHILOSOPHY: The curriculum is the district’s formal plan to ensure students graduate with the college-and career-ready skills they will need to be self-sufficient citizens, lifelong learners and competitive in today’s world. The curriculum links the district’s beliefs, expectations for student learning and instructional practices. The strength of that link is dependent upon the professional staff’s commitment to and involvement in a comprehensive, ongoing review of the curriculum. Curriculum should provide a clear, valid, and measurable set of standards and learning targets. Quality curriculum will:  Increase the probability that all students receive appropriate and adequate instruction;  Increase the consistency of what is taught among teachers within the same grade or subject area and across grade levels;  Contribute to high achievement among all groups of students over time; and  Increase the district’s ability to effectively use resources. Instruction must be supported with an exemplary curriculum that sets high expectations for teachers so that its delivery results in meaningful student learning. A consistent curriculum is necessary to ensure equitable access to learning for all students. The purpose of the curriculum is to provide a system that will ensure that students from teacher-to-teacher and school-to-school learn the same objectives at a particular grade level or course. The written curriculum should be the basis for teachers’ daily plans. Curriculum defines what we teach and what students are expected to master. TEACHING AND STUDENT LEARNING: The district believes that teachers are the most important influence on student achievement and that effective instruction causes learning. The school district is responsible for providing teachers with the resources necessary to implement the written curriculum including a comprehensive and systematic professional development program linked to curriculum design and delivery. Teachers are responsible for effectively delivering the curriculum by aligning instruction to the written curriculum and by using assessment information to ensure that the written curriculum, the taught curriculum and the learned curriculum are one in the same. 1 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN WRITTEN CURRICULUM Written curriculum for IFSD #91 will contain the following components: state standards and learning targets; a scope and sequence with suggested pacing schedules, aligned resources; and examples of instructional strategies. Guiding principles for the management of the written curriculum include:  A curriculum that involves students, teachers, principals, curriculum coordinators, parents, and/or community members, as appropriate  A curriculum that is based on a set of non-negotiable, relevant and challenging student standards which guide decisions about teaching and learning and which are aligned vertically (PK-12), horizontally and systemically across campuses  A curriculum developed to ensure that students from teacher-to-teacher and building-to- building have the same opportunity to learn the same standards at each instructional level  A curriculum that is accessible, manageable, use-friendly, and current  A curriculum that is reviewed and updated regularly at all levels: district, PLC, and classroom. TAUGHT CURRICULUM Taught curriculum refers to the delivery of the written curriculum. It is the process that is used by teachers to develop units of study, lesson plans, and/or approaches to instruction for teaching the written curriculum. Guiding principles for the management of the taught curriculum include:  Classroom instruction that is aligned to the district curriculum  Professional development for teachers to implement the curriculum  Instructional resources and programs such as textbooks, software, community resources, and other materials based upon their alignment within the written curriculum  Differentiation of learning according to the needs of each student and the complexity of the task  Ability for teachers to use flexibility and creativity in their approach and practice time for student learning success. ASSESSED CURRICULUM Assessed curriculum is that portion of the written curriculum that is measured both formally and informally, to evaluate student progress toward mastery of the curriculum. Teachers will use formative assessments to determine student achievement on given curriculum objectives and 2 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN standards. Assessment data is used to make curriculum decisions for classroom instruction and individual student needs. Guiding principles for the management of the assessed curriculum include acquisition, analyses, and communication of student achievement data to:  Guide lesson design and instruction at appropriate levels of cognition  Guide student learning  Guide district/building improvement of curriculum alignment and programmatic decisions  Communicate student performance and progress to parents so that learning can be supported at home  Guide curriculum designers and PLC’s in determining the effectiveness of the written curriculum document, resources, and instruction provided by teachers. CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT In keeping with the goals and objectives of the district’s mission, vision, continuous improvement and school improvement plan goals, we will create an aligned curriculum that promotes success for all students. Curriculum alignment is the coordination of what is written, taught, and assessed. It is also articulation of knowledge and skills from K-12, as well as the alignment of instruction within the department or grade level and from school to school. Curriculum alignment principles are to be reflected in the curriculum guides, instructional resources, staff development, instructional practices, student assessments, facilities, and budgeting. When the curriculum is aligned, there is congruence both horizontally and vertically. 3 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN PURPOSE The Curriculum Management Plan is designed to support the mission of Idaho Falls School District (IFSD #91) to develop the whole child in an atmosphere of excellence. IFSD #91 is committed to continuous improvement of teaching and learning to produce graduates that are college and career-ready. The design and implementation of the curriculum is consistent with the district’s goals, mission, board policy, state law and State Board of Education rules. The Curriculum Management Plan details a systematic, on-going program of curriculum development, assessment, implementation and evaluation of the curriculum. This curriculum management plan provides clear direction for students, teachers, and administrators. It establishes a framework that outlines guidelines and procedures for the design, delivery, monitoring, and evaluation of curriculum. IFSD #91 understands that student learning is the result of well-written aligned curriculum delivered by highly-qualified teachers using sound instructional practices. While instructional differentiation shall occur to address the unique needs of all students, instruction must be delivered from a common set of standards and curriculum objectives. This plan helps to ensure equitable access to the curriculum for all students, so that all graduates of IFSD #91are ready for college, ready for the workplace, and ready for personal success. 4 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN DEFINITIONS These guidelines and procedures are based upon the following definitions and principles about curriculum design, implementation, and evaluation. Standards – Learning outcomes that define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach. Standards help us identify teaching and learning priorities and guide our design of curriculum and assessments. Standards do not dictate curriculum or teaching methods. Unwrapping Standards - Unwrapping a standard determines the rigor of the standard, the academic vocabulary, and essential questions. Unwrapping the standards is part of the curriculum design and the PLC process, but continues with the classroom teacher prior to teaching the lesson to ensure they fully understand the student expectation and standard. When standards are unwrapped, teachers understand exactly what students must know and be able to do in order to master the standard. Unwrapping standards allows for conceptual misunderstandings to be identified within the scope of instruction. Learning Target - A shared learning target helps students grasp the lesson's purpose—why it is crucial to learn this chunk of information. Learning targets provide a common focus and guide learning. They describe, in student-friendly language, the lesson-sized chunks of information, skills, and reasoning processes that students will come to know deeply. Curriculum – A coherent framework for realizing standards including the knowledge, skills, understandings, attitudes, and processes to be written, taught, and tested at the appropriate levels within courses in a discipline. A curriculum works with standards to frame optimal learning experiences. It serves as a blueprint for learning based on desired outcomes (content and standards). The ultimate aim of a curriculum is independent transfer; i.e., for students to be able to employ their learning, independently and thoughtfully, to varied complex situations, inside and outside of school. Backwards Design – A curriculum design model where designers begin with the end in mind. There are three stages in the Backward Design Process: 1.) Identify desired results 2.) Determine acceptable evidence 3.) Plan learning experiences and instruction. Guaranteed and Viable Curriculum- Guaranteed means that all teachers are aware of the content they are responsible for teaching and are in fact, teaching that content. Viable means that the amount of content is teachable in the time available for instruction. Essentially, a 5 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN guaranteed and viable curriculum is one that can be taught in the time available and is being taught in every classroom Program – An overarching framework or field of study such as ‘English Language Arts,’ or ‘Social Studies.’ Data-driven Instruction - The use of student achievement data and other learning data to guide instruction, set goals, and monitor curriculum and programs. Differentiated Instruction – Instruction that responds to the needs of all learners by focusing on processes and procedures that ensure effective learning for varied individuals (Tomlinson, McTighe, 2006) Instructional Resources - Textbooks, anthologies, trade books, and digital media, etc., that teachers need to implement instructional activities, matched to standards for a particular course of study or subject area. Supplementary resources - Materials that complete, reinforce, or extend the curriculum. Pacing - The rate at which learning targets should be taught. Scope and Sequence – The specific learning targets that students are supposed to learn (scope) and the order in which they are to be taught (sequence). Summative Assessments - Summative assessments are given one time at the end of a trimester or school year to evaluate students’ performance against a defined set of standards. These assessments may be given at a district, state, or national level. They could also be teacher- administered end-of-unit or end-of-semester tests that are used solely for grading purposes. Formative Classroom Assessments - Assessments used by classroom teachers to diagnose where students are in their learning, where gaps in knowledge and understanding exist, and how to help teachers and students improve student learning. The assessment is embedded within the learning activity and linked directly to learning targets and standard(s). Providing corrective feedback, modifying instruction to improve the student’s understanding, or indicating areas of further instruction are essential aspects of a classroom formative assessment. Types of Formative Assessment:  Short-cycle assessment takes place within and between lessons on a day-to-day, minute- to-minute basis, resulting in high levels of student engagement, classroom practice, and on-the-spot feedback for teachers and students. Short-cycle assessments usually focus on a single learning target. 6 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN  Medium-cycle assessment occurs within and between instructional units. These assessments usually focus on multiple learning targets. These may include rubrics and curriculum based measures. Common Formative Assessments – Short-cycle assessments measuring one or two learning targets agreed upon in a PLC and administered during an agreed upon window of time. Members of the PLC use the results of the common formative assessment to collaborate on effective instructional strategies aligned to appropriate learning targets. 7 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: Board of Trustees:  Establish policies to direct and support ongoing curriculum development, implementation, and evaluation; and  Ensure there is adequate funding for curriculum development and supporting resources. Superintendent or designee:  Responsible for implementation of this policy;  Establish procedures which ensure that the curriculum development and evaluation processes include input opportunities from teachers, administrators, students and parents from all grade levels, content areas, schools, and special programs. Director of Curriculum and Professional Development:  Oversees the development, implementation, and evaluation of new curriculum. Conducts research and consults with directors, principals, and teachers in the design and development of standards-based guaranteed and viable curriculum across all content areas;  Develops and implements procedures and analysis for curriculum development, implementation, evaluation and revision;  Supervises the Curriculum and Professional Development team including curriculum coordinators and instructional coaches;  Applies research and data to improve the content, sequence, and outcomes of the teaching-learning process;  Plans the necessary time, resources, training, and materials to support the desired instructional results and student achievement;  Oversees and monitors the development and publication of curriculum guides to direct instruction;  Collaborates with Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education to support principals in high quality implementation of standards-based curriculum and in ensuring their staff understands the guaranteed and viable curriculum;  Coordinates with Directors of Secondary and Elementary Education for the annual revision of courses of study for grades K-12;  Provides guidance in the selection and use of textbooks and other teaching materials  Obtains and uses evaluative findings (including student achievement data) to examine curriculum and instruction program effectiveness. Coordinates the evaluation of current curriculum to ensure that course/program is meeting the desired results and requirements; 8 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN  Responsible for administering the district’s Title II program including all necessary grant applications, required documentation and reports, and participating in audits;  Plans and implements professional development activities for administrative, certificated and classified employees and assists building principals and teachers in planning professional development activities at the school level;  Responsible for working with administrators of private schools within our district boundaries in providing Title II related services;  Monitors professional research relating to educational developments and the advancement of curriculum and instruction and disseminates ideas and information to others;  Interprets and implements federal, state, and district law, policy or procedure related to curriculum, instruction, use of educational materials, and professional development;  Ensures the use of technology in the teaching-learning process;  Prepares and administers the budget for instructional materials;  Prepares and administers the budget for implementing professional development;  Performs other duties as assigned. Directors of Elementary and Secondary Education:  Responsible to insure that building-level administrators are monitoring the implementation of district adopted curriculum;  Develop a working knowledge of the curriculum scope and sequence for each subject/course;  Participate in professional development needed to effectively carry out these functions;  Help parents to understand their role in supporting the curriculum. Curriculum Coordinators:  Responsible for the orchestration and coordination of all curriculum development activities under the direction of the Director of Curriculum and Professional Development;  Organize and facilitate committees to develop and review the curriculum and to set priorities;  Provide/facilitate professional development needed to implement the curriculum;  Provide support to principals and teachers in their role of implementing and monitoring the curriculum and professional development; and,  Provide support for analysis and interpretation of assessment data;  Organizes and facilitates material acquisition, distribution, and removal. 9 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN Building Principals: The Principal is the key to implementing and monitoring the delivery of the curriculum. The principal must translate the importance of curriculum delivery on a daily basis. To effectively support curriculum delivery, the principal is expected to:  Develop a working knowledge of the curriculum scope and sequence for each subject/course;  Supervise teaching in each classroom on a regular basis;  Collaborate with individual teachers and/or teams;  Provide opportunities for teachers to discuss and share ideas and strategies;  Participate in professional development needed to effectively carry out these functions;  Help parents to understand their role in supporting the curriculum. Teachers: Teachers are responsible for effectively teaching the planned curriculum as directed and for assessing student mastery with a variety of assessment tools, including any required district/state assessments. Teachers:  Contribute to curriculum development and resource selection;  Implement the district curriculum;  Engage students in the learning process;  Involve parents and view them as partners in the learning process;  Participate in district/school professional development designed to support these functions;  Assist in selecting supplemental instructional resources to support the district curriculum. 10 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES When a school or district functions as a PLC, educators within the organization embrace high levels of learning for all students as both the reason the organization exists and the fundamental responsibility of those who work within it. In order to achieve this purpose, the members of a PLC create and are guided by a clear and compelling vision of what the organization must become in order to help all students learn. They make collective commitments clarifying what each member will do to create such an organization, and they use results-oriented goals to mark their progress. Members work together to clarify exactly what each student must learn, monitor each student's learning on a timely basis, provide systematic interventions that ensure students receive additional time and support for learning when they struggle, and extend and enrich learning when students have already mastered the intended outcomes. (DuFour, 2006) PLC PROCESS “The Professional Learning Community (PLC) model flows from the assumption that the core mission of formal education is not simply to ensure that students are taught but to ensure that they learn” (Dufour, 2005. P. 32). In order for the PLC process to be effective, a guaranteed and viable curriculum must be established. In each school, PLC structures ensure a collaborative culture, focused on results, within which teachers meet regularly in data teams by grade level or subject area, to analyze student work and assessment data to answer the questions: 1. What is it we expect students to learn (and how are we going to teach it)? 2. How will we know if they have learned it? 3. How do we respond when students aren’t learning? 4. What will we do if they already know/can do it? PLC’s engage in:  Unpacking state and national standards;  Examining existing curriculum and instructional resources;  Generating common formative assessments;  Analyzing student learning data (from common formative, district, and state level assessments);  Sharing proven instructional practices;  Planning intervention strategies for students who struggle;  Planning enrichment strategies for students who have mastered the target;  Examining student learning data in an effort to systematically observe, support, and enhance curriculum implementation. 11 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN It is important to focus our PLC work on the short and medium-cycle formative assessments. Short and medium-cycle assessments do not have to be created “from scratch” by the teams. Many of these tools already exist within in our curriculum and associated resources and teachers use these type of assessments every day. In following the PLC process, each PLC team needs to determine the learning target to assess, agree on an assessment, use it in their classroom, collect student work, analyze results, adjust instruction, and repeat. 12 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN Curriculum Development, Implementation, and Evaluation DATA-DRIVEN Effective use of student achievement data is critical to assessing student mastery of the standards. Data-driven instruction occurs when assessment data is used to guide instructional decisions at the student, classroom, building, and district levels. A systematic approach to data analysis is important to ensure that data is analyzed and used to improve instruction and student achievement. IFSD #91 has information management systems to house data from state, district, and building assessments. District-collected data will be used:  For teacher collaboration around student mastery of standards;  To measure our progress toward goals from IFSD #91’s Continuous Improvement Plan and School Improvement Plans, (by district, by school, by disaggregated groups);  To inform curriculum revision;  To shape professional development. CURRICULUM GUIDES Director of Curriculum and Professional Development is responsible for directing the curriculum development process for the district and working in collaboration with curriculum coordinators, curriculum designers, principals, and teachers to ensure that curriculum guides meet district mission, vision, and state standards. He/she also plans professional development necessary to successfully implement curriculum and proven instructional strategies. Each subject area will develop and deploy a Curriculum Guide. These will be living document(s) that contain essential components with enough clarity and specificity to guide teachers’ instructional planning: When appropriate, curriculum guides will contain the following components.  Standards – Aligned standards and learning targets for each unit are stated at the beginning of each unit. All standards are aligned to applicable state or national standards for each content area.  Scope and Sequence – A timeframe for teaching each standard and student expectation is provided in the scope and sequence. Components of the scope and sequence may include a Pacing guide (aligned using previous years’ data to ensure appropriate time allotment) and sequence. 13 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN  Instructional Resources - textbooks, anthologies, trade books, and digital media that teachers need to implement instructional activities, matched to standards for a particular course of study or subject area.  Supplementary resources - materials that complete, reinforce, or extend the curriculum.  Academic Vocabulary – Essential vocabulary is listed within the curriculum document for teachers to highlight or front-load for increased student understanding and success.  Essential Questions – Essential questions establish a learning focus, based on the standards throughout the entire lesson.  Rigor of Standards –level of thinking or skills rigor that is necessary for the student to successfully demonstrate mastery of the standard are included in guides.  Vertical Documents – Understanding the vertical alignment of the standards is important, so that teachers understand what learning students are coming to the grade with and what they need to be able to do when they leave. IMPLEMENTATION The district believes that teachers are the most important influence on student achievement and that effective instruction causes learning. Per Board Policy, teachers shall follow the District’s curriculum that has been designed for their teaching assignments. Teachers will be trained in the delivery of the curriculum. Principals will be expected to monitor the proper implementation of the District’s curriculum. District administration, principals, teachers, and support personnel will be expected to provide an environment of support for the delivery of the curriculum. Through PLC’s, selection committees, and curriculum design teams, teachers will have the professional opportunity to help develop curriculum, make curriculum revisions, select resources, and provide direct feedback about the curriculum. INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY IFSD #91’s curriculum guides may contain the following instructional components:  Instructional and supplementary resources;  Research-based practices, instructional strategies aligned to the state standards;  Engaging student learning activities;  Learning protocols;  Performance tasks, scoring guides, rubrics; 14 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN  Related instruction with a variety of strategies to ensure differentiation, enrichment, and intervention strategies for a variety of learners: o ELL o Special Education o Gifted and Talented  Sample assessment items;  Technology applications;  Cross-curricular components;  Student Collaboration Opportunities. It is expected that instructional delivery will be based on sound teaching principles and grounded in educational research:  Lesson plans that are aligned to IFSD #91curriculum standards per the scope and sequence;  A classroom climate that is engaging;  Positive relationships with students within a caring atmosphere;  High expectations for all students;  Opportunities for all students to experience success;  Specific feedback provided to students;  Varied time for learning according to the special needs of students and the complexity of the task;  Shared responsibility for learning among students and teachers;  Varied approaches to meet a variety of learning styles, intelligences, and needs;  Reteach and extension opportunities for students based upon formative assessment data;  Technology as a tool to teach and learn the required curriculum;  Communication with parents and students about progress toward learning targets;  Provide opportunities for students to accelerate through the curriculum requirements. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT A district professional development committee will meet quarterly to assist in a PD needs assessment and implementation plan. The Director of Curriculum and Professional Development will oversee the design and implementation of a professional development plan to empower and ensure teachers have the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver the written, taught, and tested curriculum, as needed. 15 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN  The professional development team prioritizes professional development goals and develops a plan, taking into consideration opportunities/programs, use of time, funding, available expertise (within and outside of district), technology needs, etc.;  Professional development plan is implemented;  Teachers incorporate knowledge and skills gained from professional development into classroom practice with the support of the PLCs. MONITORING CURRICULUM The Curriculum Director and Coordinator ensures that instructional resources are available, and related professional development is provided. As part of their induction and mentoring programs, new teachers receive professional development on the curriculum. EVALUATION Curriculum is updated based on data: Data Analysis:  Examine all applicable and available data;  Ask key questions to determine potential contributing factors or issues: o Development? o Implementation? o Monitoring process? o Instructional strategies employed?  Identify strengths and weaknesses of the formal written curriculum based on applicable data. Teacher Input - Throughout the year, teachers track the written curriculum, making notations for possible revisions to the written curriculum.  Make recommendations for changes  Minor changes (no impact to curriculum guide) can be implemented directly by the PLCs;  If major changes to the formal written curriculum are necessary, change request must be submitted to the Director of Curriculum and Professional Development. Curriculum Audit: Internal or external curriculum and instruction audits will be performed as needed to evaluate effectiveness of curriculum and instruction. 16 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN INSTRUCTIONAL RESOURCES AND SELECTION PROCEDURES Needs Assessment: Through data analysis, and input from directors, curriculum coordinators, instructional coaches, principals, PLC’s and teachers, curriculum needs will be assessed, prioritized, and scoped by the Director of Curriculum and Professional Development with consideration of budget, resource availability, and time restraints. The selection of instructional resources is an important part of the total educational program. The content and quality of those materials influence not only what students learn but how well they learn. Therefore, educators must be as conscientious about selecting instructional resources as they are about developing curriculum. The process of selecting instructional resources shall be systematic, objective, and thorough. Selection Criteria: The following criteria shall be considered when reviewing instructional resources or supplemental material. Curriculum coordinators may develop additional criteria for specific disciplines as needed.  Alignment with district curriculum;  Content in the instructional resource or supplemental material follow a defensible sequence of concepts and points of view;  Appropriateness for the needs, abilities and achievement level of the students;  Complete and impartial factual treatment of the subject matter;  The interest level is accessible and appropriate for as many students as possible;  Empirical evidence of effectiveness based on relevant high quality research, where available;  Current and engaging;  Encourages critical thinking;  Appropriate for the cultural and moral standards of the community. The Director of Curriculum and Professional Development shall establish priorities and oversee the selection of instructional resources and supplementary materials with the help of curriculum coordinators and instructional coaches and input from classroom and special education teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders as appropriate. Procedures: The following shall be used in analyzing, evaluating, and adopting instructional resources and supplementary materials: Once curriculum needs are identified, the Director will establish a timeline for instructional resource review and convene a selection committee as needed. For major program and multi-grade level adoptions, representation from each building will be sought, with an 17 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN attempt toward every grade level being represented. Director will work with IFEA president(s) to include association representation. Curriculum Review Procedure:  The Director or Curriculum Coordinator will conduct initial research of potential resources and solicit preview copies or logins;  The Selection Committee will review district curriculum and utilize criteria established for evaluating resources. (A General Criteria Selection Guide is provided above, but the district coordinator may develop an evaluation form specific to the content area that includes these general criteria.);  If necessary, the Selection Committee will narrow the possible choices to 3-5;  All teachers teaching the subject will be given the opportunity to examine the resources being considered for adoption and provide input. Teacher input will be provided to selection committee;  The Selection Committee will complete its evaluation and make a recommendation;  For full program adoptions (such as a K-6 math adoption or a high school science adoption) the Director of Curriculum and Professional Development will present the recommendation (from the selection committee) as a formal proposal for adoption to the Board of Trustees with three readings. Resources will be posted online and available for review by patrons. Patron input will be provided to Board of Trustees.  For smaller resource adoptions (such as AP Physics or 7th grade Reading) the Director will submit a proposal including costs as part of the Board of Trustee’s consent agenda.  The adoption of some instructional resources may not need to involve an extensive review process or board approval. The Curriculum Director will make that decision.  All instructional resources and supplemental materials will be purchased based on needs assessment and with consideration of budget, resource availability, and time restraints through the district office. Resources for special education will be included with all new adoption purchases. DISPOSAL OF OBSOLETE CURRICULUM As curriculum resources and materials are deemed worn out, obsolete, surplus, or otherwise unusable in schools, Superintendent or designee may authorize disposal in accordance with Board Policy Section 312. 18 CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT PLAN References “About PLCs.” All Things PLC. March 12, 2208. Solution Tree. Retrieved May 22, 2008, from http://www.allthingsplc.info/about/aboutPLC.php Ainsworth, Larry. (2010). Rigorous curriculum design: How to create curricular units of study that align standards, instruction, and assessment. Englewood, CO: Leadership and Learning Center Cape Elizabeth Schools. (June 2008). Curriculum Management Plan. Retrieved May 16, 2016 from http://www.cape.k12.me.us/sup_pages/2008_CE_Curriculum_Management_Plan.pdf Chappuis, S., Stiggins, R., Arter, J., & Chappuis, J., (2005). Assessment for learning: An action guide for school leaders. Portland, OR: Assessment Training Institute. DuFour, R., Eaker, R., & DuFour, R. (Eds.), (2005). On common ground: The power of professional learning communities. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., Many, T. (2006). Learning by Doing:A Handbook for Professional Learning Communities at Work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree. Marzano, R., Pickering, J., & Pollock, J. (2001). Classroom instruction that works: Researched- based strategies for increasing student achievement. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Northwest Independent School District. (2014). Curriculum Management Plan. Retrieved June 2, 2016 from http://www.nisdtx.org/UserFiles/Servers/Server_232117/File/Departments/Curriculu m%20Management/Curriculum%20Management%20Plan/CurriculummanagementPlan 9-7-14.pdf Tomlinson, C., & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction & understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (1998). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. 19